Politics

Should critical race theory training be 'abolished' in the federal government?

 
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WRITTEN BY
Nov 21 01:29 am

Bonnie (Yes)

There are better ways to teach racial sensitivity instead of Critical Race Theory (CRT), which is excessively critical of the US and White people. CRT is so consumed with 'whiteness' that it gives the impression no other racism exists. Any theory that imputes fault on the part of one race over another is bound to incite more racial ill will than it will solve. Racism exists between all races throughout history. Even Black people have shown extreme racism toward other Black people—just consider the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. CRT negates the whole civil rights movement, countering MLK Jr.’s philosophy of not judging a person by his or her skin color, but by their character. It groups people based on their outward appearance and assigns guilt without evidence. 

Since CRT is an extension of Marxism, it claims the only solution is to completely overthrow a society instead of working to change it. Practically speaking, CRT means you spend all your time looking for racism because racism can supposedly be found everywhere. This means nothing would ever be accomplished because people will continuously be looking for racism in each other instead of working together to accomplish something for everybody's good. People will be focusing on each other's faults instead of their strengths. Many examples of discrimination exist in the world today besides white against black or vice versa. America is not and has never been the sole promoter of racism or injustice. In fact, America remains one of the most non-racist nations in the world where anyone can come join as a citizen and thrive. To insinuate and teach otherwise breeds the divisive ideology that’s fueling much of the civil unrest we are seeing today.  

 

Ellery (No)

President Donald Trump recently declared federal racial sensitivity programs designed to discuss systemic racism issues and America’s rightful part played in it all as 'Anti-American.' The program in question, Critical Race Theory training, focuses on critiquing societal power structures, showing that racial inequality is a direct result of the cultural and economic divides that people in power, usually White people, have created to maintain their power. It is concerned with examining power dynamics and dismantling systems that advance those who oppress over those who are oppressed. And, just looking at current events shows this ongoing training and discussion couldn't be more true or more necessary than the present age.

The disparities between Whites and Blacks in America are brought forth as evidence to CRT’s mission. For example, federal contracts are awarded at extremely disproportionate rates to White-owned businesses. And as highlighted by the current Black Lives Matter movement, police groups, some of which were founded as slave catching groups, still teach policing practices that subjugate minority groups. Many other studies show that courts silence minority voices by actively removing Black jurors. Even if critical race theory is Anti-American, 'abolishing' it certainly is. This would appear to be an obvious censoring of freedom of speech, a core aspect of the constitution. Moreso, it would be attempting to silence that which serves to uphold America's fundamental baseline as we know it: the concept that all men are created equal. Perhaps, as critical race theory suggests, the most patriotic thing you can do is want better for your nation.

Fact Box

  • In its current form, Critical Race Theory was developed in the 1970s by 'scholars like Derrick Bell, Alan Freeman, and Richard Delgado, who responded to what they identified as dangerously slow progress following Civil Rights in the 1960s.'
  • On September 22, 2020, President Trump signed an Executive Order to suspend CRT training within the federal government, saying that the ideology behind such training is 'rooted in the pernicious and false belief that America is an irredeemably racist and sexist country; that some people, simply on account of their race or sex, are oppressors; and that racial and sexual identities are more important than our common status as human beings and Americans.'
  • According to a recent Wall Street Journal poll, 56% of respondents said, 'American society is racist.'
  • A 2019 study by Harvard Business School's Edward Chang revealed that 'a one-hour, one-off training might change attitudes but not behaviors in the workplace.' Chang suggests that 'instead of [one-off] trainings, companies should think about how they can embed diversity and inclusion practices throughout their organization.'

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